Razor edge bonnet fitted

Cutting-edge Landy goodness and some musical catching up…

I cannot believe the summer is nearly over, so many plans, then so many non Land Rover problems to deal with, and then the heat wave that we’re supposed to relish but in reality it was all too much. I hope for an Indian summer so that I will have a little more to show for this year, although the other problems show no sign of abating.

I bought the bonnet many months ago and it’s been leaning up against the shed gathering cobwebs. Considering its age it’s in remarkable condition. Once the heat had subsided I spent a couple of evenings rubbing it down. The existing paint was very thick and I am 99% sure that it is matt-finish household emulsion paint. But whatever it is, it has adhered well to the aluminium although it’s soft and quite porous.

Rubbing down the bonnet

Rubbing down the bonnet

When I had finished, the lawn had taken on a shade of blue and I was sweeping up this powdery mess for days. I etch-primed both sides. The etch primer didn’t appear to react to any remaining finish. I sprayed the underside with a silver paint and brushed marine blue to the steel framework as it seemed more waterproof. I then used a 4″ roller to coat the top. I gave it 3 coats, rubbing down with wet and dry between. It isn’t easy because the large dome-head rivets get in the way and I kept breaking through on these.

The finish is far from perfect, and it could definitely do with another rub down and coat but following a weekend of mini-disasters and unexpected expense I was desperate to see some results, so this evening after tea I took it outside and fitted it.

You are supposed to bolt the hinges to the bonnet, then slide it into place in the fully upright position, but that requires an assistant. So I slotted the hinges (with new bushings 346849) into the bulkhead and laid the bonnet in place, raised the front with a piece of timber and managed to bolt the hinges to the bonnet. This went well and for the first time in days I felt I’d achieved something.

The bonnet fitted

The bonnet fitted

The bonnet fitted

Cleaned up striker mechanism

Hinge, bonnet buffer, pretend-rivet

I fitted new rubber buffers (332647) – these stop the bonnet bashing against the bulkhead. These were a pig to get in, until I read that Fairy Liquid makes the ideal lubricant for this operation, it works perfectly where everything else I tried had failed.

The refurbished, original hinges look smart. This bonnet originally had the Series 2 type 4-hole hinges, so in the vacant holes, as I have no suitable rivets, I used a couple of M5 domed socket screws that came off my bicycle when I recently fitted a new derailleur, and added a little filler to the sockets, they are exactly the right size and shape.

So, although I really should have given it one more coat, I am very pleased with the overall result, hopefully no more water pouring into the engine now the ‘deluxe’ bonnet has gone, along with its rainwater-collection / distribution dish.

Musical news and developments

Just lately, it’s felt like I am spending more time thinking and talking about band problems than anything else. If you’re not careful, bands can take over your life. There was an extreme clash of two characters in the band, and after a huge falling out during a gig, accompanied by outbursts, threats, and swearing and revving of engines we are now without a keyboard player. So, we have been relying on deps and helping them get through the night as seamlessly as possible while we go through the process of finding the right person. Of course the band just has to be there on Saturday night, whatever happens, and as each Saturday gets closer, the more urgent the problem becomes, but we seem to have got by so far thanks mainly to an outstandingly talented Sue who just seems to fit in, but who is sadly not available full-time.

Hofner bass

Amongst all this, I finally got to play my Hofner properly with its La Bella black nylon strings, albeit not a gig, but a very enjoyable jam with Trev and Andy. I had lost interest in the instrument, but going back to it on my favourite bass was an enjoyable experience that I look forward to repeating.

Fender Telecaster Bass

I’ve never even held one of these before, at first glance they seem almost identical to the original Precision bass except for the (humbucker?) pickup, and feel rather plank-like, but in a nice way.

A couple of Sundays ago I had been invited to a surprise 70th birthday party for Brian, an old drummer friend from the past. The party was at The Lady Haven pub in Gt Yarmouth and it was my first chance to try out the S40 on a run, I’m pleased with this motor.

I took a guitar, in case there was a jam. but left it in the car in case there wasn’t. When I got there I was delighted to see a full pub, a lovely spread, drum-kit, PA and backline, but much more delighted to find the complete line-up of an old band from years ago, a very emotional Brian, Stuart, Sue and me. We used to play a lot around Yarmouth and Norwich during the 1990s. For a beautiful hour we played our old ‘Park Lane’ set, all harmony stuff from the sixties, and after a gap of 25 years I remembered everything as if it were yesterday, it was really well-received. Thanks very much to Sloppy Dave for loaning me his lovely old Telecaster bass for the set.

Park Lane: Me on Sloppy Dave’s bass, Brian, Sue and Stuart

Thanks for dropping by….

 

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